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Conditions Common in African American Skin

 

Dry skin
Most people think of African American skin as being greasy or oily. But in fact, the opposite is true. African American skin tends to be dry and sensitive. When black skin is dry it tends to look very dull and "ashy." Dry skin can also be itchy, and uncomfortable. Dry skin needs special care in the techniques and products used for cleansing, moisturizing, and protecting. Be sure to look for organic skin care products that are especially made for dry skin, (preferable for dry, African American skin.) Wash your face gently in the mornings and evenings with a non-abrasive cleanser and warm water. Apply an organic moisturizer liberally after cleansing to nourish and hydrate the skin. Even though African American skin has a high melanin concentration, you still need to protect your skin with a natural sunscreen of SPF 15 or higher.

If your scalp is dry, look for organic hair-care products that are gentle to your scalp. Products that make your hair easier to style will help to reduce the brushing and tugging on the scalp that can aggravate dryness. Be careful when you apply hair products to keep them off of your neck and forehead as they could cause your skin to break out.

Keloids
Keloids, (pronounced KEE-loyds) are small bumps that form around scars. They can develop on any skin type, but they occur most frequently on African American skin. Keloids are usually found on the ear lobes, neck, hands, or arms. They may develop as a result of an infection or surgery, or they may just appear for no reason at all. They come in a variety of shapes and sizes.

Keloids can be treated and visibly reduced with the help of a dermatologist. Injections, surgery, lasers, or radiation are the most common methods used for the treatment of keloids. However, even after treatment, keloids may redevelop in the same location.

Flesh Moles
Flesh moles are brown or black raised spots that may develop on the cheeks. They look like moles or flat warts and they are very common among African American women. Although flesh moles are not cancerous, many women have them removed to improve their appearance.

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